Use A Raspberry Pi And A CPU Miner To Mine Altcoins

VeriCoin

The home for the most innovative cryptocurrency, VeriCoin and Verium VeriCoin: Proof-of-Stake-Time Protocol. PoST Verified. Verium: Proof-of-Work-Time Protocol. PoWT Verified. CPU Mine-able (GPU and ASIC Resistant)
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XMG - Coin of the Magi

Coin of the Magi is a peer-to-peer global currency that enables instant payments to anyone in the world. XMG utilizes proof-of-work and proof-of-stake systems and is CPU and eco focussed - rewards reduce as hash increases.
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Litecoin

For discussion about Litecoin, the leading cryptocurrency derived from Bitcoin. Litecoin is developed with a focus on speed, efficiency, and wider initial coin distribution through the use of scrypt-based mining.
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Solar Powered Bitcoin Mining with Raspberry Pi and a pair of Gekko Science 15Gh/s 2Pac USB ASIC mining sticks

Solar Powered Bitcoin Mining with Raspberry Pi and a pair of Gekko Science 15Gh/s 2Pac USB ASIC mining sticks submitted by megadumpmedia to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Solar Powered Bitcoin Mining with Raspberry Pi and a pair of Gekko Science 15Gh/s 2Pac USB ASIC mining sticks

Solar Powered Bitcoin Mining with Raspberry Pi and a pair of Gekko Science 15Gh/s 2Pac USB ASIC mining sticks submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Solar Powered Bitcoin Mining with Raspberry Pi and a pair of Gekko Science 15Gh/s 2Pac USB ASIC mining sticks

submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAllTV [link] [comments]

Is Bitcoin mining with Raspberry Pi worth while?

I saw someone else's post today about how. It got me curious: is it worth while to use the RasPi for bit mining when I'm not playing? For those that do, approximately how much do you make? Which ASIC are you using and would you recommend it? Thanks.
submitted by umlguru to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

ELI5 21Inc.: Why a $400 Linux device with an embedded mining chip that earns $0.05 a day is better than a $40 Raspberry Pi that can be loaded with $360 of Bitcoin, for the same price.

submitted by ether0234 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Cryptocurrency Enthusiast Succesfully Mines Bitcoin on a 1985 NES Console | Doesn't actually mine a block but is capable of running mining software with the help of a Raspberry Pi

Cryptocurrency Enthusiast Succesfully Mines Bitcoin on a 1985 NES Console | Doesn't actually mine a block but is capable of running mining software with the help of a Raspberry Pi submitted by odog_ to savedyouaclick [link] [comments]

“Bitcoin” mining on Raspberry Pi 3 with multiple USB miners

I’m just trying out “Bitcoin” mining to familiarize myself with the world of mining before investing in more powerful Th/s miners. I plan to use one of my Raspberry Pi’s with a powered USB hub connected with possibly 2-4 USB miners running with a USB fan as these things get pretty hot. Possible miners would be multiples of the Antminer U1, Antminer U2, or the GekkoScience device. My questions are: 1-Will a Raspberry Pi 3 work with a USB hub? 2-Can CGminer run properly with multiple devices and be able to consolidate the processing power of each miner?
Thanks in advance.
submitted by piberry999 to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Mining Bitcoin with Raspberry Pi?

Hello! At the moment, I don't use my Raspberry Pi for something usefull. A friend of my recommended that I could start mining Bitcoin.
I have never done it before (Just some days on my computer. Manged to mine 0,00x something Bitcoin), and I wanted to try it out after reading this.
I know that I am not able to generate that much Bitcoin, but I just want to start. As I said, I don't use it to anything else. Why not mining for Bitcoin?
I have never done it before on Linux. My idea was to buy a USB Hub, a fan, and a lot of these.
So, how would this actually work with the Raspberry? I am afraid that it's using a bit to much power than the Raspberry can handle. Fortunately, the USB Hub is powered.
Can I buy two of these hubs, and then connect 9 miners on each? Is this actually possible?
Do you have any great tutorials on how I can easily set up a miner on Raspberry Pi?
Thank you very much!
submitted by Prentasid to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

How To Mine Bitcoins with a Raspberry Pi and Antminer U1 For Fun

How To Mine Bitcoins with a Raspberry Pi and Antminer U1 For Fun submitted by WeControlsTheSpice to howto [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining with the Raspberry Pi and AntMiner U1 For Fun

Bitcoin Mining with the Raspberry Pi and AntMiner U1 For Fun submitted by WeControlsTheSpice to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Mining with the Raspberry Pi and Antminer U1 For Fun

Bitcoin Mining with the Raspberry Pi and Antminer U1 For Fun submitted by WeControlsTheSpice to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

How much money can I make by mining with a Raspberry Pi. /r/Bitcoin

How much money can I make by mining with a Raspberry Pi. /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

ELI5 21Inc.: Why a $400 Linux device with an embedded mining chip that earns $0.05 a day is better than a $40 Raspberry Pi that can be loaded with $360 of Bitcoin, for the same price. /r/Bitcoin

ELI5 21Inc.: Why a $400 Linux device with an embedded mining chip that earns $0.05 a day is better than a $40 Raspberry Pi that can be loaded with $360 of Bitcoin, for the same price. /Bitcoin submitted by coincrazyy to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Can I mine with a Raspberry Pi or is it too late? /r/Bitcoin

Can I mine with a Raspberry Pi or is it too late? /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Do you think it is possible to mine Bitcoins and Dogecoins with Raspberry Pi?

I had this crazy idea, but...I don't know if it is something possible with Raspberry Pi.
Do you think it is possible to mine Bitcoins and Dogecoins with Raspberry Pi? If not, what about using Arduino?
submitted by alex_the_doge to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Can i mine bitcoins with raspberry pi 3

Can i mine bitcoins with raspberry pi 3.will i get profit? or loss if its profit which pool is best for beginners? and which wallet site is best and secure?
submitted by Saiko47 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

I was thinking of starting to mine Bitcoin with my Raspberry Pi... /r/btc

I was thinking of starting to mine Bitcoin with my Raspberry Pi... /btc submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Guide To Mine Bitcoin With Raspberry Pi?

Hi guys I'm bored, want something fun to do with a spare 2B, anyone got an easy to follow guide to do this? I know I won't make any bitcoins, but its something Ive wanted to do for a few years and never had the time. Thank you very much for the help!
submitted by geregegregw to raspberry_pi [link] [comments]

Can i mine bitcoins with raspberry pi 3 /r/Bitcoin

Can i mine bitcoins with raspberry pi 3 /Bitcoin submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Newcomers FAQ - Please read!

Welcome to the /Bitcoin Sticky FAQ

You've probably been hearing a lot about Bitcoin recently and are wondering what's the big deal? Most of your questions should be answered by the resources below but if you have additional questions feel free to ask them in the comments.
It all started with the release of the release of Satoshi Nakamoto's whitepaper however that will probably go over the head of most readers so we recommend the following videos for a good starting point for understanding how bitcoin works and a little about its long term potential:
Some other great resources include Lopp.net, the Princeton crypto series and James D'Angelo's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard series.
Some excellent writing on Bitcoin's value proposition and future can be found at the Satoshi Nakamoto Institute.
Some Bitcoin statistics can be found here and here. Developer resources can be found here. Peer-reviewed research papers can be found here.
Potential upcoming protocol improvements and scaling resources here and here.
The number of times Bitcoin was declared dead by the media can be found here (LOL!)

Key properties of Bitcoin

Where can I buy bitcoins?

Bitcoin.org and BuyBitcoinWorldwide.com are helpful sites for beginners. You can buy or sell any amount of bitcoin (even just a few dollars worth) and there are several easy methods to purchase bitcoin with cash, credit card or bank transfer. Some of the more popular resources are below, also check out the bitcoinity exchange resources for a larger list of options for purchases.
Here is a listing of local ATMs. If you would like your paycheck automatically converted to bitcoin use Bitwage.
Note: Bitcoins are valued at whatever market price people are willing to pay for them in balancing act of supply vs demand. Unlike traditional markets, bitcoin markets operate 24 hours per day, 365 days per year. Preev is a useful site that that shows how much various denominations of bitcoin are worth in different currencies. Alternatively you can just Google "1 bitcoin in (your local currency)".

Securing your bitcoins

With bitcoin you can "Be your own bank" and personally secure your bitcoins OR you can use third party companies aka "Bitcoin banks" which will hold the bitcoins for you.
Note: For increased security, use Two Factor Authentication (2FA) everywhere it is offered, including email!
2FA requires a second confirmation code to access your account making it much harder for thieves to gain access. Google Authenticator and Authy are the two most popular 2FA services, download links are below. Make sure you create backups of your 2FA codes.
Google Auth Authy OTP Auth
Android Android N/A
iOS iOS iOS

Watch out for scams

As mentioned above, Bitcoin is decentralized, which by definition means there is no official website or Twitter handle or spokesperson or CEO. However, all money attracts thieves. This combination unfortunately results in scammers running official sounding names or pretending to be an authority on YouTube or social media. Many scammers throughout the years have claimed to be the inventor of Bitcoin. Websites like bitcoin(dot)com and the btc subreddit are active scams. Almost all altcoins (shitcoins) are marketed heavily with big promises but are really just designed to separate you from your bitcoin. So be careful: any resource, including all linked in this document, may in the future turn evil. Don't trust, verify. Also as they say in our community "Not your keys, not your coins".

Where can I spend bitcoins?

Check out spendabit or bitcoin directory for millions of merchant options. Also you can spend bitcoin anywhere visa is accepted with bitcoin debit cards such as the CashApp card. Some other useful site are listed below.
Store Product
Gyft Gift cards for hundreds of retailers including Amazon, Target, Walmart, Starbucks, Whole Foods, CVS, Lowes, Home Depot, iTunes, Best Buy, Sears, Kohls, eBay, GameStop, etc.
Spendabit, Overstock and The Bitcoin Directory Retail shopping with millions of results
ShakePay Generate one time use Visa cards in seconds
NewEgg and Dell For all your electronics needs
Bitwa.la, Coinbills, Piixpay, Bitbill.eu, Bylls, Coins.ph, Bitrefill, LivingRoomofSatoshi, Coinsfer, and more Bill payment
Menufy, Takeaway and Thuisbezorgd NL Takeout delivered to your door
Expedia, Cheapair, Destinia, Abitsky, SkyTours, the Travel category on Gyft and 9flats For when you need to get away
Cryptostorm, Mullvad, and PIA VPN services
Namecheap, Porkbun Domain name registration
Stampnik Discounted USPS Priority, Express, First-Class mail postage
Coinmap and AirBitz are helpful to find local businesses accepting bitcoins. A good resource for UK residents is at wheretospendbitcoins.co.uk.
There are also lots of charities which accept bitcoin donations.

Merchant Resources

There are several benefits to accepting bitcoin as a payment option if you are a merchant;
If you are interested in accepting bitcoin as a payment method, there are several options available;

Can I mine bitcoin?

Mining bitcoins can be a fun learning experience, but be aware that you will most likely operate at a loss. Newcomers are often advised to stay away from mining unless they are only interested in it as a hobby similar to folding at home. If you want to learn more about mining you can read more here. Still have mining questions? The crew at /BitcoinMining would be happy to help you out.
If you want to contribute to the bitcoin network by hosting the blockchain and propagating transactions you can run a full node using this setup guide. If you would prefer to keep it simple there are several good options. You can view the global node distribution here.

Earning bitcoins

Just like any other form of money, you can also earn bitcoins by being paid to do a job.
Site Description
WorkingForBitcoins, Bitwage, Cryptogrind, Coinality, Bitgigs, /Jobs4Bitcoins, BitforTip, Rein Project Freelancing
Lolli Earn bitcoin when you shop online!
OpenBazaar, Purse.io, Bitify, /Bitmarket, 21 Market Marketplaces
/GirlsGoneBitcoin NSFW Adult services
A-ads, Coinzilla.io Advertising
You can also earn bitcoins by participating as a market maker on JoinMarket by allowing users to perform CoinJoin transactions with your bitcoins for a small fee (requires you to already have some bitcoins.

Bitcoin-Related Projects

The following is a short list of ongoing projects that might be worth taking a look at if you are interested in current development in the bitcoin space.
Project Description
Lightning Network Second layer scaling
Blockstream, Rootstock and Drivechain Sidechains
Hivemind and Augur Prediction markets
Tierion and Factom Records & Titles on the blockchain
BitMarkets, DropZone, Beaver and Open Bazaar Decentralized markets
JoinMarket and Wasabi Wallet CoinJoin implementation
Coinffeine and Bisq Decentralized bitcoin exchanges
Keybase Identity & Reputation management
Abra Global P2P money transmitter network
Bitcore Open source Bitcoin javascript library

Bitcoin Units

One Bitcoin is quite large (hundreds of £/$/€) so people often deal in smaller units. The most common subunits are listed below:
Unit Symbol Value Info
bitcoin BTC 1 bitcoin one bitcoin is equal to 100 million satoshis
millibitcoin mBTC 1,000 per bitcoin used as default unit in recent Electrum wallet releases
bit bit 1,000,000 per bitcoin colloquial "slang" term for microbitcoin (μBTC)
satoshi sat 100,000,000 per bitcoin smallest unit in bitcoin, named after the inventor
For example, assuming an arbitrary exchange rate of $10000 for one Bitcoin, a $10 meal would equal:
For more information check out the Bitcoin units wiki.
Still have questions? Feel free to ask in the comments below or stick around for our weekly Mentor Monday thread. If you decide to post a question in /Bitcoin, please use the search bar to see if it has been answered before, and remember to follow the community rules outlined on the sidebar to receive a better response. The mods are busy helping manage our community so please do not message them unless you notice problems with the functionality of the subreddit.
Note: This is a community created FAQ. If you notice anything missing from the FAQ or that requires clarification you can edit it here and it will be included in the next revision pending approval.
Welcome to the Bitcoin community and the new decentralized economy!
submitted by BitcoinFan7 to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Why Osana takes so long? (Programmer's point of view on current situation)

I decided to write a comment about «Why Osana takes so long?» somewhere and what can be done to shorten this time. It turned into a long essay. Here's TL;DR of it:
The cost of never paying down this technical debt is clear; eventually the cost to deliver functionality will become so slow that it is easy for a well-designed competitive software product to overtake the badly-designed software in terms of features. In my experience, badly designed software can also lead to a more stressed engineering workforce, in turn leading higher staff churn (which in turn affects costs and productivity when delivering features). Additionally, due to the complexity in a given codebase, the ability to accurately estimate work will also disappear.
Junade Ali, Mastering PHP Design Patterns (2016)
Longer version: I am not sure if people here wanted an explanation from a real developer who works with C and with relatively large projects, but I am going to do it nonetheless. I am not much interested in Yandere Simulator nor in this genre in general, but this particular development has a lot to learn from for any fellow programmers and software engineers to ensure that they'll never end up in Alex's situation, especially considering that he is definitely not the first one to got himself knee-deep in the development hell (do you remember Star Citizen?) and he is definitely not the last one.
On the one hand, people see that Alex works incredibly slowly, equivalent of, like, one hour per day, comparing it with, say, Papers, Please, the game that was developed in nine months from start to finish by one guy. On the other hand, Alex himself most likely thinks that he works until complete exhaustion each day. In fact, I highly suspect that both those sentences are correct! Because of the mistakes made during early development stages, which are highly unlikely to be fixed due to the pressure put on the developer right now and due to his overall approach to coding, cost to add any relatively large feature (e.g. Osana) can be pretty much comparable to the cost of creating a fan game from start to finish. Trust me, I've seen his leaked source code (don't tell anybody about that) and I know what I am talking about. The largest problem in Yandere Simulator right now is its super slow development. So, without further ado, let's talk about how «implementing the low hanging fruit» crippled the development and, more importantly, what would have been an ideal course of action from my point of view to get out. I'll try to explain things in the easiest terms possible.
  1. else if's and lack any sort of refactoring in general
The most «memey» one. I won't talk about the performance though (switch statement is not better in terms of performance, it is a myth. If compiler detects some code that can be turned into a jump table, for example, it will do it, no matter if it is a chain of if's or a switch statement. Compilers nowadays are way smarter than one might think). Just take a look here. I know that it's his older JavaScript code, but, believe it or not, this piece is still present in C# version relatively untouched.
I refactored this code for you using C language (mixed with C++ since there's no this pointer in pure C). Take a note that else if's are still there, else if's are not the problem by itself.
The refactored code is just objectively better for one simple reason: it is shorter, while not being obscure, and now it should be able to handle, say, Trespassing and Blood case without any input from the developer due to the usage of flags. Basically, the shorter your code, the more you can see on screen without spreading your attention too much. As a rule of thumb, the less lines there are, the easier it is for you to work with the code. Just don't overkill that, unless you are going to participate in International Obfuscated C Code Contest. Let me reiterate:
Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.
Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
This is why refactoring — activity of rewriting your old code so it does the same thing, but does it quicker, in a more generic way, in less lines or simpler — is so powerful. In my experience, you can only keep one module/class/whatever in your brain if it does not exceed ~1000 lines, maybe ~1500. Splitting 17000-line-long class into smaller classes probably won't improve performance at all, but it will make working with parts of this class way easier.
Is it too late now to start refactoring? Of course NO: better late than never.
  1. Comments
If you think that you wrote this code, so you'll always easily remember it, I have some bad news for you: you won't. In my experience, one week and that's it. That's why comments are so crucial. It is not necessary to put a ton of comments everywhere, but just a general idea will help you out in the future. Even if you think that It Just Works™ and you'll never ever need to fix it. Time spent to write and debug one line of code almost always exceeds time to write one comment in large-scale projects. Moreover, the best code is the code that is self-evident. In the example above, what the hell does (float) 6 mean? Why not wrap it around into the constant with a good, self-descriptive name? Again, it won't affect performance, since C# compiler is smart enough to silently remove this constant from the real code and place its value into the method invocation directly. Such constants are here for you.
I rewrote my code above a little bit to illustrate this. With those comments, you don't have to remember your code at all, since its functionality is outlined in two tiny lines of comments above it. Moreover, even a person with zero knowledge in programming will figure out the purpose of this code. It took me less than half a minute to write those comments, but it'll probably save me quite a lot of time of figuring out «what was I thinking back then» one day.
Is it too late now to start adding comments? Again, of course NO. Don't be lazy and redirect all your typing from «debunk» page (which pretty much does the opposite of debunking, but who am I to judge you here?) into some useful comments.
  1. Unit testing
This is often neglected, but consider the following. You wrote some code, you ran your game, you saw a new bug. Was it introduced right now? Is it a problem in your older code which has shown up just because you have never actually used it until now? Where should you search for it? You have no idea, and you have one painful debugging session ahead. Just imagine how easier it would be if you've had some routines which automatically execute after each build and check that environment is still sane and nothing broke on a fundamental level. This is called unit testing, and yes, unit tests won't be able to catch all your bugs, but even getting 20% of bugs identified at the earlier stage is a huge boon to development speed.
Is it too late now to start adding unit tests? Kinda YES and NO at the same time. Unit testing works best if it covers the majority of project's code. On the other side, a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. If you decide to start refactoring your code, writing a unit test before refactoring will help you to prove to yourself that you have not broken anything without the need of running the game at all.
  1. Static code analysis
This is basically pretty self-explanatory. You set this thing once, you forget about it. Static code analyzer is another «free estate» to speed up the development process by finding tiny little errors, mostly silly typos (do you think that you are good enough in finding them? Well, good luck catching x << 4; in place of x <<= 4; buried deep in C code by eye!). Again, this is not a silver bullet, it is another tool which will help you out with debugging a little bit along with the debugger, unit tests and other things. You need every little bit of help here.
Is it too late now to hook up static code analyzer? Obviously NO.
  1. Code architecture
Say, you want to build Osana, but then you decided to implement some feature, e.g. Snap Mode. By doing this you have maybe made your game a little bit better, but what you have just essentially done is complicated your life, because now you should also write Osana code for Snap Mode. The way game architecture is done right now, easter eggs code is deeply interleaved with game logic, which leads to code «spaghettifying», which in turn slows down the addition of new features, because one has to consider how this feature would work alongside each and every old feature and easter egg. Even if it is just gazing over one line per easter egg, it adds up to the mess, slowly but surely.
A lot of people mention that developer should have been doing it in object-oritented way. However, there is no silver bullet in programming. It does not matter that much if you are doing it object-oriented way or usual procedural way; you can theoretically write, say, AI routines on functional (e.g. LISP)) or even logical language if you are brave enough (e.g. Prolog). You can even invent your own tiny programming language! The only thing that matters is code quality and avoiding the so-called shotgun surgery situation, which plagues Yandere Simulator from top to bottom right now. Is there a way of adding a new feature without interfering with your older code (e.g. by creating a child class which will encapsulate all the things you need, for example)? Go for it, this feature is basically «free» for you. Otherwise you'd better think twice before doing this, because you are going into the «technical debt» territory, borrowing your time from the future by saying «I'll maybe optimize it later» and «a thousand more lines probably won't slow me down in the future that much, right?». Technical debt will incur interest on its own that you'll have to pay. Basically, the entire situation around Osana right now is just a huge tale about how just «interest» incurred by technical debt can control the entire project, like the tail wiggling the dog.
I won't elaborate here further, since it'll take me an even larger post to fully describe what's wrong about Yandere Simulator's code architecture.
Is it too late to rebuild code architecture? Sadly, YES, although it should be possible to split Student class into descendants by using hooks for individual students. However, code architecture can be improved by a vast margin if you start removing easter eggs and features like Snap Mode that currently bloat Yandere Simulator. I know it is going to be painful, but it is the only way to improve code quality here and now. This will simplify the code, and this will make it easier for you to add the «real» features, like Osana or whatever you'd like to accomplish. If you'll ever want them back, you can track them down in Git history and re-implement them one by one, hopefully without performing the shotgun surgery this time.
  1. Loading times
Again, I won't be talking about the performance, since you can debug your game on 20 FPS as well as on 60 FPS, but this is a very different story. Yandere Simulator is huge. Once you fixed a bug, you want to test it, right? And your workflow right now probably looks like this:
  1. Fix the code (unavoidable time loss)
  2. Rebuild the project (can take a loooong time)
  3. Load your game (can take a loooong time)
  4. Test it (unavoidable time loss, unless another bug has popped up via unit testing, code analyzer etc.)
And you can fix it. For instance, I know that Yandere Simulator makes all the students' photos during loading. Why should that be done there? Why not either move it to project building stage by adding build hook so Unity does that for you during full project rebuild, or, even better, why not disable it completely or replace with «PLACEHOLDER» text for debug builds? Each second spent watching the loading screen will be rightfully interpreted as «son is not coding» by the community.
Is it too late to reduce loading times? Hell NO.
  1. Jenkins
Or any other continuous integration tool. «Rebuild a project» can take a long time too, and what can we do about that? Let me give you an idea. Buy a new PC. Get a 32-core Threadripper, 32 GB of fastest RAM you can afford and a cool motherboard which would support all of that (of course, Ryzen/i5/Celeron/i386/Raspberry Pi is fine too, but the faster, the better). The rest is not necessary, e.g. a barely functional second hand video card burned out by bitcoin mining is fine. You set up another PC in your room. You connect it to your network. You set up ramdisk to speed things up even more. You properly set up Jenkins) on this PC. From now on, Jenkins cares about the rest: tracking your Git repository, (re)building process, large and time-consuming unit tests, invoking static code analyzer, profiling, generating reports and whatever else you can and want to hook up. More importantly, you can fix another bug while Jenkins is rebuilding the project for the previous one et cetera.
In general, continuous integration is a great technology to quickly track down errors that were introduced in previous versions, attempting to avoid those kinds of bug hunting sessions. I am highly unsure if continuous integration is needed for 10000-20000 source lines long projects, but things can be different as soon as we step into the 100k+ territory, and Yandere Simulator by now has approximately 150k+ source lines of code. I think that probably continuous integration might be well worth it for Yandere Simulator.
Is it too late to add continuous integration? NO, albeit it is going to take some time and skills to set up.
  1. Stop caring about the criticism
Stop comparing Alex to Scott Cawton. IMO Alex is very similar to the person known as SgtMarkIV, the developer of Brutal Doom, who is also a notorious edgelord who, for example, also once told somebody to kill himself, just like… However, being a horrible person, SgtMarkIV does his job. He simply does not care much about public opinion. That's the difference.
  1. Go outside
Enough said. Your brain works slower if you only think about games and if you can't provide it with enough oxygen supply. I know that this one is probably the hardest to implement, but…
That's all, folks.
Bonus: Do you think how short this list would have been if someone just simply listened to Mike Zaimont instead of breaking down in tears?
submitted by Dezhitse to Osana [link] [comments]

Multiple DHT22 Sensors

Hello all, first thing first, I am a computer repair technician at a Bitcoin mining facility. We have about 20,000 bitcoin miners that me and my coworkers are in charge of monitoring and repairing. So with that being said I am pretty much lost when it comes to python and servers and things of that sort.Everyone that has dealt with computers/electronics know that heat is a huge issue. And heat is a killer to bitcoin miners,so monitoring the temperature and humidity in the facility is crucial so we can control the waterwalls and such as needed .I have successfully set up 14 raspberry pis with DHT22 sensors by copying and pasting scripts that I found online. They are reporting to a website through POST method. The readings are shown on a barchart,but is not dynamic so it only shows 1 reading at a time. I have been tasked with setting up a way to get all the sensors reading to a single server,then pulling the data from the server onto a D3.js grouped bar chart . Now, there is 14 Pis and each is set to read every mintue. These will be running 24/7 so there will be alot of readings. My question,actually a few questions is I am needing to set up 1 Pi as a dedicated server receiving all the readings. 1)What would be the best way to set that up,I have read that a MQTT server is the easiest but cant handle a lot of data(which I will have)I was thinking about a MySql. 2)Would I need to attach extra storage to this Pi to handle all the data. 3) How do I send all the readings to the server Pi(NOTE: they will all be on the same network) 4) How would I pull all this information from the server and input it into a D3.js grouped bar chart. Do I need to have a web server installed on the Pi?. I'm not expecting a step by step answer, and I am on a timeline and honestly dont have time to learn pythhon,html,php,sql or whatever is needed for this. All I am asking is for is a step in the right direction, thanks to all that read this and any information will be greatly appreciated
submitted by AbsentGalaxy to RASPBERRY_PI_PROJECTS [link] [comments]

4 GH/s Raspberry PI Bitcoin Miner - PiMiner - YouTube How to mine Bitcoins on your Raspberry Pi Working USB Bitcoin Farm with Raspberry Pi running Minera Bitcoin Miner Setup : Raspberry Pi - YouTube

Following these steps will leave you with a very energy efficient bitcoin miner, as a Raspberry Pi only uses four watts of power, and a miner is typically 2.5W. Mining used to be done with computers consuming over 700W for the same process so to make a jump in savings helps repay the cost of the hardware we are using. Cryptocurrency is incredibly popular, from Bitcoin to Litecoin, Ethereum, and Monero. These digital assets are digital, decentralized currencies. There are two main methods for obtaining cryptocurrency: mining and purchasing. Learn all about cryptocurrency mining on the Raspberry Pi! To make a Raspberry Pi bitcoin mining rig,For deploying the mining Rig in 2018, you will need Raspberry Pi ,A pool account , USB Bitcoin miner,Bitcoin Wallet Raspbian image SD card.When the installation is complete, you just have to save a file named wallet.dat, . this way make a Raspberry Pi bitcoin mining rig. The raspberry pi is capable of mining ethereum at a low hashrate. You should be able to get some coins at the end of the month. However, due to the level of difficulty increase over time, you should always compare your earnings with the cost of power to stay profitable. But, currencies like BitCoin have worked on a sliding scale, meaning it has become more difficult to mine a coin (and the value of the coin has risen). For that reason, mining with a Raspberry Pi has traditionally been counterproductive—it would take you years and years to even make up the cost of the Pi itself.

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4 GH/s Raspberry PI Bitcoin Miner - PiMiner - YouTube

Raspberry PI Bitcoin Miner with Adafuit LCD Block Erupter: https://amzn.to/2nwwHak Raspberry Pi 3: https://amzn.to/2OvZBTQ 10-Port USB Hub: https://amzn.to/2... Hey Everyone! This is a tutorial on how to setup a fully functioning bitcoin miner using a Raspberry pi. Raspberry pi's are extremely useful for programming ... Raspberry Pi Bitcoin Mining For 12 Hours! - Duration: 8:27. Rasim Muratovic 425,475 views. 8:27. BITCOIN Mining in 2019 - ASIC USB Miner - Does it make Sense ? - Duration: 11:28. Download and Compile BFGMiner on Raspberry Pi B for Bitcoin mining - Duration: 4:52. roshanrr2006 11,626 views. 4:52. Lockheed SR 71 Blackbird - Duration: 15:01.

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